Watching Virus Spread Back Home, Some Americans in Africa Stay Put

With the U.S. now leading the world in Covid-19 cases, its health care system fraying and economy faltering, some Americans abroad see their country in an unsettling light.

By Dionne Searcey and Ruth Maclean | New York Times

Mask shortages in hospitals. Inadequate coronavirus testing. Medical supplies flown in from overseas. And an international charity setting up a field hospital in Central Park. John Shaw watched from afar what was going on back home in the United States and decided to stay put, in Kenya.

Continue reading “Watching Virus Spread Back Home, Some Americans in Africa Stay Put”

US Health Secretary Applauds Uganda’s Ebola Control Efforts

U.S. Secretary for Health and Human Services Alex Azar has applauded Uganda’s efforts to control the spread of Ebola in east and central Africa; however, while the U.S. remains the primary funder of Uganda’s health care sector, the secretary did not shy away from asking the East African country to find funds to independently sustain its health care budget.

Continue reading “US Health Secretary Applauds Uganda’s Ebola Control Efforts”

Seattle nurse speaks on battling Ebola outbreaks in Africa: ‘It’s the best job in the world’

By Ryan Blethen

Karin Huster encounters death up close, and repeatedly.

She has seen babies perish in their mothers’ arms. She has watched people grieve as their loved ones were buried in white body bags drenched in bleach. She has survived a clinic where she worked being attacked, burned and shot at.

Continue reading “Seattle nurse speaks on battling Ebola outbreaks in Africa: ‘It’s the best job in the world’”

US-Based Kenyan Nuclear Medicine Expert Advises Kenya Gov’t on How to Deal with Cancer Menace

By John Wanjohi

US-based Kenyan Nuclear Medicine expert John Gitau Wairimu has advised the Kenyan government on how to address the cancer menace in the country.

Gitau, who made history by being among the first four students in the United States to graduate with a Master’s degree in Nuclear Medicine in 2017, said the government’s main focus should be to diagnose cancer in the early stages. Continue reading “US-Based Kenyan Nuclear Medicine Expert Advises Kenya Gov’t on How to Deal with Cancer Menace”

US-BASED PHARMACEUTICAL FIRM TO START MAKING CANCER DRUGS IN RWANDA

By Tobiloba Ishola

Lifting and Empowering All Families (L.E.A.F) Rwanda will start production of the first complex generic cancer medicine, L.E.A.F.-1404. This was announced after an agreement was reached with US Contract Manufacturing Organisation (CMO), through the firm’s parent company, LEAF Pharmaceuticals LLC, which is based in the United States. Continue reading “US-BASED PHARMACEUTICAL FIRM TO START MAKING CANCER DRUGS IN RWANDA”

13 American neurosurgeons land in Kisumu for a ten-day exercise

By Curtis Otieno

A team of 13 neurosurgeons from the US have landed in Kisumu, in Kenya, where they will treat locals with special health problems for ten days.The group began its services at the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Teaching and Referral Hospital (JOOTRH) where they will be handling among others, spinal fractures. Continue reading “13 American neurosurgeons land in Kisumu for a ten-day exercise”

Kenya and Tanzania face big cuts in US anti-Aids funding – Daily Nation

By Kelvin Kelley, NEW YORK,

Failure to provide essential data or to serve especially vulnerable groups will result in deep cuts in US anti-Aids funding for Kenya and Tanzania, a global development NGO said on Wednesday.

The President’s Emergency Programme for Aids Relief (Pepfar), a US initiative launched in 2003, plans to reduce spending for Kenya from 2018’s level of $505 million to $395 million in 2020. For Tanzania, Pepfar funding is set to drop from $512 million to $395 million. Continue reading “Kenya and Tanzania face big cuts in US anti-Aids funding – Daily Nation”

University of Calgary partnership helps improve childbirth safety for moms and babies in Tanzania

Two-thirds of all global maternal deaths in 2015 occurred in sub-Saharan Africa, so efforts to improve the safety of childbirth are urgently needed. For four years, the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) has led a Canadian government-funded maternal health partnership initiative in rural Tanzania.

Known locally as Mama na Mtoto (mother and baby in Swahili), the project provides on-the-ground clinical, education and research support to help mothers and babies. Continue reading “University of Calgary partnership helps improve childbirth safety for moms and babies in Tanzania”