African-American plans $50m Diaspora Palace, Resort in Badagry, Nigeria

By Abdullateef Aliyu

Some of the visiting African-Americans in Badagry, Lagos. An African-American, David Anderson, who is the founder and president of the Bridge Leader Network (BLN), a diversity consulting firm, is set to build a multimillion dollar Diasporan Royal Palace and Resort in Badagry, the ancient Lagos Town and centre of the Transatlantic slave trade.

The gigantic project estimated to cost between $30m to $50m would be sited at Gberefu, a community known as the ‘Point of No Return’, where the European slave merchants took their captors to board ship to unknown destinations.

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For Two Decades, Morocco Has Been an Important Ally of the US

By Ahmed Charai

In 1999, King Mohammed VI took the throne after his father’s death, and pledged to renew the monarchy on the basis of steady political and social reforms toward inclusive governance, egalitarianism and the rule of law.

He initiated an equity and reconciliation commission to both acknowledge the prior suffering of elements of the Moroccan population at the hands of the security services and begin to compensate the families for their losses. Continue reading “For Two Decades, Morocco Has Been an Important Ally of the US”

Watch the exciting moment African-American women officially became registered voters in Ghana [Video]

By Etsey Atisu

African Americans who have traced their ancestral roots to Ghana, and those living in Ghana with the hope of becoming citizens, have received another boost in their desires after they successfully received final documentation that officially makes them registered voters.

https://youtu.be/Y0LNQHLOKzQ Continue reading “Watch the exciting moment African-American women officially became registered voters in Ghana [Video]”

12 African Leaders Set To Attend US-AFRICA Summit

By Olumide Oyekunle

12 African leaders, over 1000 American and African private sector executives. Who is going and who is not?

Organizers hope to bring more than 1,000 American and African private sector executives, international investors, senior government officials, and multilateral stakeholders. The aim will be to open up the African market to US Investors in the wake of recent Chinese resolute incursions. Continue reading “12 African Leaders Set To Attend US-AFRICA Summit”

Panel: U.S. Base in Djibouti Key to American Interests in Africa

By: John Grady

Camp Lemonier, the American base in Djibouti, is becoming more integral to U.S. interests in the volatile region surrounding the Red Sea, a leading regional expert said Thursday.

The region presents an excellent opportunity for the United States “to have a unifying role,” for the maritime transit path, Zach Vertin, a fellow at the Doha Center of Brookings Institution, told USNI News on Thursday. Continue reading “Panel: U.S. Base in Djibouti Key to American Interests in Africa”

How the BUILD Act Can Invigorate U.S. Economic Ties in Africa

By Ed Royce and Robin Renee Sanders

Since the U.S. BUILD Act was signed into law last October, many people across Africa as well as members of the Africa Diaspora have been asking what this global initiative might do to help revitalize American engagement with the continent. The answer is: quite a lot! Continue reading “How the BUILD Act Can Invigorate U.S. Economic Ties in Africa”

How Africa became collateral damage in US-China trade war

Fall in export earnings revealed the weakness many of these countries share: a dependency on one or two key commodities,

Gavin du Venage reports from Cape Town


As the trade war between the US and China rumbles on, some African countries are becoming collateral damage in the dispute.

President Donald Trump’s administration wants to close the $400 billion (Dh1.46 trillion) trade gap with China, and placed tariffs of 10 to 25 per cent on about $250bn worth of Chinese goods.

Although Africa is not targeted in the dispute, many of the 54 countries on the continent depend on commodity exports, especially to China. Continue reading “How Africa became collateral damage in US-China trade war”

Revealed: The U.S. has 36 code-named military operations in Africa

By Nick Turse and Sean D. Naylor

Many Americans first became aware of U.S. military operations in Africa in October 2017, after the Islamic State ambushed American troops near Tongo Tongo, Niger, killing four U.S. soldiers and wounding two others.

Just after the attack, U.S. Africa Command said U.S. troops were providing “advice and assistance” to local counterparts. Later, it would become clear that those troops — the 11-man Operational Detachment-Alpha Team 3212 — were working out of the town of Oullam with a larger Nigerian force under the umbrella of Operation Juniper Shield, a wide-ranging counterterrorism effort in northwest Africa.

American troops 2

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US Virginia state senator says 30 June revolution reflected Egyptians’ will

Richard Hayden Black, a Republican member of the Virginia State Senate, affirmed that the 30 June 2013 revolution in Egypt cannot be referred to as a “coup,” as 30 million protesters took to the streets against former president Mohamed Morsi, sending a clear message that it was time for him to leave.

Black’s remarks came during a discussion session held by the Pulse of America Foundation for Public Relations and Media Production in the US Congress to discuss Egyptian-American relations.

The session was moderated by Michael Morgan, a political researcher at the London Center for Policy Research (LCPR) in Washington. Continue reading “US Virginia state senator says 30 June revolution reflected Egyptians’ will”

U.S. Acknowledges Airstrike in Somalia Caused Civilian Deaths

By Thomas Gibbons-Neff

WASHINGTON — After denying allegations last month that United States airstrikes had killed civilians in Somalia, the American military said on Friday that an April 2018 attack left two people dead.

The announcement comes after Gen. Thomas D. Waldhauser, the head of Africa Command, ordered a review of all airstrikes conducted in Somalia since 2017.

The internal assessment was prompted by pressure from lawmakers and an Amnesty International report released last month that found evidence of five strikes in Somalia that had killed more than a dozen civilians. Continue reading “U.S. Acknowledges Airstrike in Somalia Caused Civilian Deaths”