Tag Archives: Americans in Morocco

Audible Football Camp to Launch Morocco’s First American Football Conference

By Celia Konstantellou

Audible Football Camp, a non-profit US organization, will partner with Rabat Pirates, the Moroccan association of American football, to organize the first major American football conference in the country’s history.

The five-day conference will be held from July 12 to July 16, 2019 in Ben Slimane. It will be open to all American football lovers, including people who are already play the sport, as well as to anyone seeking to discover more about it. Read more

UIC student goes to Morocco on State Department scholarship

By Ray Hanania

University of Illinois at Chicago sophomore Luana Davila of Joliet has been awarded a U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship to study Arabic in Morocco this summer.

Davila, who is a classics major and Arabic minor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a member of the UIC Honors College, is one of approximately 550 competitively selected American students from over 230 U.S. colleges and universities who received the award this year. Read more

Why you should explore Morocco with this Canadian company

By Jennifer Bain

What happens when a do-it-yourselfer lets go and outsources travel plans? When my oldest daughter wanted to visit Morocco and I was too busy to properly plan a first trip to Africa, I cautiously turned to G Adventures for help.

The adventure travel pioneer has a Canadian founder — Bruce Poon Tip — and promises an “intimate, authentic and sustainable” approach to small-group travel. Here’s why we let them guide us on a fast-paced trip from Casablanca to Marrakech. Read more

Beyond the Headlines: Finding Peace in the Recovering Village of Imlil

Imlil, where two Scandinavian tourists were killed in Morocco, is not a headline, but a small village of walnut and fruit production, an access point to Mount Toubkal, and a peaceful community

By Carolina Mccabe
As a young American woman studying in Morocco, I received many messages of concern regarding the murder of two young Scandinavian tourists in December.

Following the attack, family and friends in Morocco and the United States alike told me to be extra vigilant of my surroundings, warned me to stay far from areas deemed “dangerous,” and expressed their concern for my safety.

While I was slightly concerned for my own safety as an American teenage girl living in Rabat, I recognized that the murder of the two young women did not embody who Moroccans are or what Morocco is. I continued to live normally in Rabat with some more vigilance.

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